$CCNI – Command Center quick update

It’s only been just over 3 months since I originally wrote about Command Center. You can check out the original write-up here.

Long story short, nothing has changed except I feel the thesis is slightly derisked after a decent Q2. Since mid-2016 the organization has been focused on right-sizing operations and the results are showing.

  • The company is growing mid single digits organically
  • The aqcuisition of Hancock has delivered as expected
  • Margins and revenue are expanding at the individual store level
  • It sounds like the bottom is in for North Dakota business activity

The company now trades at a market cap of 21.3 mil with 4.1 mil in net cash. They have bought back some stock and are looking at potential acquisitions. I estimate ttm FCF at just over 3 mil. Though the shares responded well to Q2 earnings, they are only back to where they traded in April of this year.

I believe that CCNI is a buy at this price.

 

Dean

 

Disclosure: the author is long CCNI at time of writing.

Leave a comment

Filed under Company Updates

Pulse Seismic Quick Update

Quick update on what is a low risk high uncertainty stock in the portfolio.

  • Q2 2017 numbers came out and were a little better than last year. The outlook provided was murky at best. Given how lumpy the transactional revenues are, it’s too be expected.
  • And very recently the company announced the largest transactional licensing sale in history at 29.5mil. This is a pretty big deal given that revenue for the previous 12 months was 15.4 mil.
  • on the news the company was up about 7.5% which equates to around 11 million in market cap. If you use the historical FCF margin for this business of 65%, the deal likely added closer to 20 mil in cash to the balance sheet.

Given how much hype there is around electric vehicles, I’m not sure there has ever been so much negativity around oil and gas production. At least not since the great recession.

Dean

Disclosure: the author is long PSD.to at time of writing.

Leave a comment

Filed under Company Updates

Profire Energy (PFIE)

Rounding out what is my 3rd bet on the beaten down energy sector is Profire Energy. This will be a quick post to encourage further conversation.

The company makes burner management systems used in the oil and gas industry. They recently launched a new product (PF3100) that encompasses more solutions for operators. The products not only have a value proposition from a cost to operator standpoint but from a safety standpoint as well. They are a dominant player in the space.

The company is cash flow positive even during this time of much lower business activity. This is speaks to their cost structure and discipline.

The CEO owns over 25% of the company though he sold some shares to the company recently.

They are cashed up, have zero debt and 0.40/share in net cash.

Profire Investor Presentation May 2017

The author is long PFIE at time of writing.

Leave a comment

Filed under Company Analysis

Command Center – CCNI

If you have been checking the “Portfolio” tab you would have noticed that I have a position in CCNI. I’ll give some thoughts on the company and hope to instigate some discussion.

Company Description

Command Center, Inc. is a staffing company. The Company operates primarily in the manual labor segment of the staffing industry. The Company provides on-demand employees for manual labor, light industrial and skilled trades applications. Its customers are primarily small to mid-sized businesses in the wholesale trades, manufacturing, hospitality, construction, retail and auto auction industries. The Company owns and operates approximately 60 on-demand labor stores in over 20 states. In addition to short and longer term temporary work assignments, the Company recruits and places workers in temp-to-hire situations.

Some History

From 2007 to 2012 CCNI would bump around from being profitable to losing money, the recession certainly didn’t help and you can see the big drop in revenue from 2008 to 2010. The current CEO was brought in 2013 to turn around operations. And you can see the margin expansion taking place as the focus on operations took hold. Closing unprofitable branches, coaching the under-performing branches/managers, and strategically expanding location count drove margins higher.  Margins were at a record and the company was generating solid FCF. Focus shifted from day to day operations to expanding the footprint. North Dakota became 25% of revenue in 2014 and the future was looking bright.

A few things happened starting in late 2014 and early 2015 and hit margins.

  • the oil and gas industry seen the worst decline in a number of cycles
  • some of the branches (not sure exactly how many) were not taking on the correct work and focus on high margin, high value add work was lost

Management did recognize the issues and put provisions in place to right size them. In the meantime, share price suffered.

Through 2015 and H1 2016 comparable year-over-year results suffered. Investors became fatigued and some have been quite combative. Such things happen when expectations eclipse reality.

I’m not going to comment on the competency of management and what should or should not be done. Obviously, given that I have a position I feel I can trust them with my capital.

Today

The last 3 quarters we have started to see operational improvements and better communication to shareholders. Recent (small) acquisition is delivering as expected and is an example of what the cash can be used for to grow the business.

CCNI now trades at around 8x FCF without any margin expansion. The CEO has clearly stated that he feels that 2017 will see higher revenue and margins. The low multiple and cash generating ability of the business will open up options to increase shareholder value.

Given the risk/reward profile, I think CCNI is worth buying under $0.50.

Feel free to comment.

 

Thanks,

 

Dean

 

*the author is long CCNI at time of writing

5 Comments

Filed under Company Analysis

HWO.to Q1 2017 – quick update

I picked up some shares of High Arctic Energy Services post Q1 earnings and after the AGM. I like the risk/reward of this company given where I think we are in the cycle.

The company has a strong position in PNG and recent acquisition in Canada should ensure that earnings stay at least flat through the cycle.  Concord Well Servicing (came over with the Tervita assets acquisition) has a large fleet in the WCSB and the stabilization in oil should bring stronger utilization throughout 2017.

I believe there are other opportunities in Canada to pick up some assets on the cheap. Hopefully we will see more in 2017.

Management is conservative with leverage and has done a good job of taking advantage of the downturn.

Another nice tidbit is the board is going to limit the total dilution potential via stock options to management. The proposal passed at the AGM but 15-20% of shares voted against the option, DSU and RSU plan.

Valuation

HWO.to nearly net cash and trading at 5-6x ttm FCF. Shares trade quite cheap for a few reasons:

  • cyclical company during the worst downturn in oil and gas in many cycles
  • I don’t think the investment community appreciates their PNG operations
  • 42% of shares are held by Cyrus Capital making this company quite illiquid

Risks

  • the obvious is activity based on the price of oil
  • PNG may be lumpy given that the company operates a small amount of rigs and having 2 idle for a long duration will hurt revenue from PNG
  • short term volatility if Cyrus decides to liquidate their position in such an illiquid stock

Feel free to comment;

 

Dean

 

The author is long HWO.to at time of writing.

Leave a comment

Filed under Company Updates

High Arctic Energy Services – (HWO.to)

I started this post in late 2016. Since then the company has released Q4 2016 numbers. Though not 100% up to date, all the arguments are relative today.

I will be the first to admit that I have had mixed results investing in oil and gas related names. I think it’s pretty safe to say that we are closer to the bottom of the cycle than the top, but who knows.

I have owned HWO.to in the past and was lucky enough to sell mid 2014. Recently I have been sniffing around the O&G services companies in hopes of finding a company that will not only survive the current environment, but be bigger and better for the next cycle.

I believe HWO is a great example of a company taking advantage of the downturn by purchasing assets on the cheap in a non-dilutive manner.

PNG

The majority of their revenue comes from Papua New Guinea (see below for quarterly revenue).

geo_split

They own some high quality rigs in an environment where they have been able to keep several rigs utilized at any given time. PNG has been stable due to the large natural gas reserves and their LNG prospects. HWO has operated their for 9 years and built strong relationships with the major players. Admittedly, there is risk that the rigs in PNG are able to find work after their contracts are up.

Canadian Operations

For most part HWO’s Canadian operations have followed the overall business activity in Canada. Some decent Q’s, some lackluster and the typical spring break-up that’s associated with Western Canada.

This summer HWO acquired assets from TerVita. This including 85 rigs with various capabilities, rental equipment, engineering services, 5 owned locations, 300 employees and the right to use the legacy brand (which has a 30 year history in the marketplace). Apparently TerVita had too high of a debt load going into the downturn.

Thesis

The thesis is quite simple. The PNG operations I think are worth at least the current share price. They have a handful of high quality rigs, equipment rentals, and of course their existing presence.

The upside comes from two places:

  1. Increased activity in Western Canada. I’ll let the reader draw their own conclusions, but prices and activity seem to have stabilized in Alberta. Many service companies are recalling crews for the winter.
  2. Strong management team with several levers to pull to grow the business. I think the recent acquisitions show a patience and discipline in the current environment. Holding cash and waiting for the right opportunity takes time. I have seen several companies enter this downturn with excess cash only to wait too long to cut expenses and waste the opportunity. The chart below shows when HWO made major growth expenditures. (I did have to make some assumptions on what constitutes “growth”) As you can see the majority has been in the last quarter. The interim CEO was the former President and CEO of IROC Energy Services. He is interested in growing HWO given the current opportunity.

capex

Valuation

Market Cap and Enterprise Value are around $260mil. Using some assumptions, I think 40-50 mil in FCF is reasonable from operations. Making HWO trading at 5-7x FCF. Pretty cheap without having much contribution from Canadian operations.

I’ll be at the AGM in May.

hwo-investor-presentation-oct2016

Q4_Investor_Presentation_March_2017_03232017

Anyone else own HWO or finding value in the O&G market?

 

Thanks,

 

Dean

Leave a comment

Filed under Company Analysis

BioSyent – RX.v

This post will be a short post as BioSyent is well known in the investment community and I have nothing material to add. Instead I will focus on how my view of a BioSyent type company has changed.

BioSyent almost perfectly embodies my maturity as investor. The company has grown rapidly, operates in a market that I am not well versed on, and is expensive.

In the past I would have overlooked BioSyent immediately. And to be honest I had initially overlooked it when it was first mentioned on twitter when shares where less than $1.00. As I was developing my qualitative skills as a microcap investor I wanted to get exposure to best in class management teams. A tagged along with a friend as was introduced to management of BioSyent. I was impressed and was willing to at the very least follow RX.v to see if there would ever be an opportunity to purchase shares at a more reasonable valuation.

I started formally tracking BioSyent in mid 2015. Shares were trading about where they are today after running all the way from under $1.00 to over $12.

I have seen a pattern with many high growth companies. The company usually is dramatically undervalued and shares trade extremely cheap. Then something changes the future of the business and the market is slow to react. The share price increases but not as quickly as the fundamentals of the business. As the company continues to execute the increase in valuation is higher than the increase in earnings. Suddenly, the company can do no wrong. Eventually the company’s momentum wanes and there is nothing to support the high valuation. Shares come back down to earth on the slightest stumble or pause in growth.

There are a few different likely outcomes:

  1. The rise in earnings was a temporary phenomenon and the shares will continue to trade lower.
  2. The rise is earnings is sustainable but the growth has disappeared as the share price needs to re-rate to the new reality.
  3. The rise in earnings is temporarily paused and the company enters transition mode. New products/services are being introduced, but do not drive enough revenue to have an impact to overall results. While the transition period drags on the shareholder base is slowly churned through. Many start to question whether or not they will see growth again. Short term investors are slowly replaced by longer term investors who believe in the story.

Being long RX.v I obviously believe we are in the middle of the 3rd outcome. The valuation of RX.v is high, but I am comfortable that my capital is being put to work wisely and management is aligned with shareholders.

The share price may be volatile in the short term, but looking out 2-5 years, I beleive $8/share will appear cheap. BioSyent may have fallen victim to tax loss selling and/or additional selling pressure as a Canadian investor’s shun all things pharma related after the blowup of Valeant.

Are there company’s that you are willing to pay a premium for?

Thanks,

Dean

Leave a comment

Filed under Company Analysis